Housing

Mayor de Blasio and the big developers that fueled his campaign have done little to slow the skyrocketing cost of housing.

Spend five minutes talking to anyone about how they are doing, and the cost of housing is going to come up. Mayor de Blasio and the big developers that fueled his campaign have done little to slow the skyrocketing cost of housing. From Rockaway to Harlem, Mott Haven to Midwood, and everywhere in between, we hear a common refrain from regular New Yorkers: “I love this city, but I don’t know if I can afford to stay much longer.”

We can and we must do better. That is why Sal has refused to accept contributions from for-profit developers. Unlike de Blasio, when Sal gets to City Hall he will be free to put neighborhoods first. He will fight so that those who grew up here can afford to stay and those who move here can afford to lay down roots and thrive.

As Mayor, Sal will:

• Focus not just on preserving, but on building more units of affordable housing. This includes exploring a tax on pied-à-terre (aka non-primary) properties, with revenues dedicated to an affordable housing fund.

• Craft a New Deal for our neighborhoods so that developers are held accountable for the promises that they make. This includes tying affordability to local median income and requiring clawback provisions.

• Add supportive housing for seniors, veterans, homeless New Yorkers, disconnected youth, and survivors of domestic violence.

• Launch a fund that takes savings from shelter reductions and reinvests them in homelessness prevention services and supportive housing.

• Reform and strengthen NYCHA, the “Sixth Borough,” by fast-tracking repairs, reducing violent crime, ending the absurd double-taxing of residents for sanitation and other services, and introducing a participatory NYCHA Community Budget.